Từ điển trực tuyến - Online Dictionary
subject
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English - Vietnamese Dictionary
subject /'sʌbdʤikt/
  • danh từ
    • chủ đề; vấn đề
      • to propose a subject for the debate: đề nghị chủ đề một cuộc thảo luận
      • historical subject: chủ đề lịch sử
      • on the subject of: về, về vấn đề, liên quan đến
      • to change the subject: lãng sang chuyện (vấn đề) khác
    • dân, thần dân
      • the liberty of the subject: quyền tự do của người dân
    • (ngôn ngữ học) chủ ngữ
    • (triết học) chủ thể
      • subject and object: chủ thể và khách thể
    • đối tượng (thí nghiệm, nghiên cứu)
    • môn học
      • mathematics is my favorite subject: toán là môn học tôi thích nhất
    • người (có vấn đề, ốm yếu...)
      • bilious subject: người hay cáu
    • dịp
      • a subject for congratulation: một dịp để chúc mừng
      • a subject for ridicule: một dịp để nhạo báng
    • (y học) xác (dùng) để mổ xẻ ((cũng) subject for dissection)
    • tính từ
      • lệ thuộc, không độc lập, ở dưới quyền, bị chinh phục
        • the subject nations: những nước lệ thuộc
      • phải chịu, khó tránh khỏi, dễ bị
        • to be subject to danage: dễ bị hư hại
      • (từ cổ,nghĩa cổ), (thơ ca) ở dưới
        • the subject plains: những cánh đồng ở dưới
      • subject to (dùng như phó từ) lệ thuộc vào, tuỳ theo
        • subject to your consent: tuỳ theo anh có đồng ý hay không
    • ngoại động từ
      • chinh phục, khuất phục (một dân tộc...)
      • bắt phải chịu, đưa ra (để góp ý...)
        • must be subjected to great heat: phải chịu một độ nhiệt cao
        • I shall subject it to criticism: tôi sẽ đưa vấn đề đó ra để (các bạn) góp ý
        • to subject someone to an operation: đưa ai lên bàn mổ
    Concise Dictionary
    subjects|subjected|subjecting'sʌbʒɪkt
    noun
    +the subject matter of a conversation or discussion
    +some situation or event that is thought about
    +a branch of knowledge
    +something (a person or object or scene) selected by an artist or photographer for graphic representation
    +a person who is subjected to experimental or other observational procedures; someone who is an object of investigation
    +a person who owes allegiance to that nation
    +(grammar) one of the two main constituents of a sentence; the grammatical constituent about which something is predicated
    +(logic) the first term of a proposition
    verb
    +cause to experience or suffer or make liable or vulnerable to
    +make accountable for
    +make subservient; force to submit or subdue
    +refer for judgment or consideration
    adj.
    +not exempt from tax
    +possibly accepting or permitting
    +being under the power or sovereignty of another or others
    +likely to be affected by something (especially something unpleasant)

    Thesaurus Dictionary
    n.
    1 (subject-)matter, topic; issue, theme, angle, thesis, gist, substance, business, affair, point:
    What is the subject of conversation today? The subject under discussion was of crucial importance.
    2 course (of study), field, area, discipline, branch of knowledge:
    In which subject did Frank take his doctorate?
    3 cause, ground(s), motive, reason, basis, source, rationale; excuse:
    Increased taxes are always a subject of complaint.
    4 participant, case, guinea-pig, testee:
    The subjects of the experiment were all in their thirties.
    5 citizen, national; taxpayer, voter; liegeman, vassal:
    She became a British subject after her marriage to Frank.
    adj.
    6 Usually, subject to. exposed (to), open (to), vulnerable (to), susceptible (to), prone (to), disposed (to), at the mercy (of), liable (to suffer or undergo):
    She is subject to asthma attacks. This kind of wood is subject to worm infestation.
    7 discussed, under discussion, referred to, above:
    The subject book was not returned before the due date.
    8 subject to.
    (a) answerable to, responsible for, bound by, obedient to, subservient to, submissive to, controlled by, under the control of:
    You are subject to the same laws as everyone else.
    (b) dependent on, conditional on, contingent on:
    All leave is subject to the approval of the departmental head.
    v.
    9 subject to. expose, lay open, submit, put through, impose on, cause to undergo:
    How could anyone subject another human being to such cruelty?
    10 conquer, subjugate, dominate, subdue, enslave, enthral, crush, humble:
    The peoples subjected by the Romans sometimes fared better than when independent.
    Advanced English Dictionary
    noun, adjective, verb
    + noun
    of conversation / book
    1 [C] a thing or person that is being discussed, described or dealt with: an unpleasant subject of conversation + books on many different subjects + a magazine article on the subject of space travel + I have nothing more to say on the subject. + I wish you'd change the subject (= talk about sth else). + How did we get onto the subject of marriage? + We seem to have got off the subject we're meant to be discussing. + Nelson Mandela is the subject of a new biography. + Climate change is still very much a subject for debate.
    at school / college
    2 [C] an area of knowledge studied in a school, college, etc: Biology and English are my favourite subjects.
    of picture / photograph
    3 a person or thing that is the main feature of a picture or photograph, or that a work of art is based on: Focus the camera on the subject. + Classical landscapes were a popular subject with many 18th-century painters.
    of experiment
    4 [C] a person or thing being used to study sth, especially in an experiment: We need male subjects between the ages of 18 and 25 for the experiment.
    grammar
    5 [C] a noun, noun phrase or pronoun representing the person or thing that performs the action of the verb (I in I sat down.), about which sth is stated (the house in The house is very old.) or, in a PASSIVE sentence, that is affected by the action of the verb (the tree in The tree was blown down in the storm.)
    Compare: OBJECT n. (4), PREDICATE
    of country
    6 a person who has the right to belong to a particular country, especially one with a king or queen: a British / French subject - CITIZEN
    + adjective
    1 ~ to sth likely to be affected by sth, especially sth bad: Flights are subject to delay because of the fog. + Smokers are more subject to heart attacks than non-smokers.
    2 ~ to sth depending on sth in order to be completed or agreed: The article is ready to publish, subject to your approval. + All the holidays on offer are subject to availability.
    3 ~ to sth/sb under the authority of sth/sb: All nuclear installations are subject to international safeguards. + As a diplomat, he is not subject to local laws.
    4 [only before noun] (formal) controlled by the government of another country: subject peoples
    + verb [VN] ~ sth (to sth) (formal) to bring a country or group of people under your control, especially by using force: The Roman Empire subjected most of Europe to its rule.
    subjection noun [U]
    Phrasal Verbs: subject sb/sth to sth [often passive] (written) to make sb/sth experience, suffer or be affected by sth, usually sth unpleasant: to be subjected to abuse / ridicule / harassment / criticism + The city was subjected to heavy bombing. + The defence lawyers claimed that the prisoners had been subjected to cruel and degrading treatment.
    Collocation Dictionary
    noun

    1 topic or person under consideration

    ADJ.

    big, complex, vast | simple | excellent, fascinating, good, interesting | cheerful
    Can we talk about a more cheerful subject?
    | gloomy, unpleasant | delicate, difficult, embarrassing | taboo
    Work is a taboo subject when we go out for dinner.
    | closed
    I don't wish to discuss it any further?the subject is closed.
    | chosen
    Each candidate has to speak for three minutes on their chosen subject.
    | pet
    Once he gets onto his pet subject there's no stopping him.

    VERB + SUBJECT

    cover, debate, discuss, talk about, touch on
    We touched briefly on the subject.
    | deal with
    I wasn't quite sure how to deal with the delicate subject of money.
    | examine, have a (fresh) look at, investigate, look into
    We want to have a fresh look at the difficult subject of social security benefits.
    | bring up, broach, get onto, raise | drop
    Let's drop the subject since we don't seem to be able to agree.
    | stick to
    I wish he'd stick to the subject rather than telling us his boring stories.
    | get off, wander off
    She was supposed to be speaking about sales figures, but she kept wandering off the subject.
    | get back to, return to
    Getting back to the subject of heating, has anyone got any suggestions for improvements?
    | avoid | change
    Don't change the subject.

    SUBJECT + VERB

    arise, come up
    The subject of gambling has come up several times recently.

    SUBJECT + NOUN

    matter
    I like the way she writes, although I'm not interested in her subject matter.

    PREP.

    on a/the ~
    While we're on the subject of the theatre, has anyone been to see the new show?

    PHRASES

    a range of subjects
    We discussed a wide range of subjects.

    2 area of study

    ADJ.

    difficult, easy | compulsory, core, main | additional, optional, special, subsidiary | specialist | arts, science | academic

    VERB + SUBJECT

    take
    What subjects are you taking at A level?
    | offer
    The department offers seven different subjects in all.
    | fail (in), pass
    She was disappointed to fail in two of her four subjects.
    | drop

    SUBJECT + NOUN

    area
    The syllabus is divided into five subject areas.

    PREP.

    in a/the ~
    He did well in every subject.

    PHRASES

    a choice of subject/subjects
    His unusual choice of subjects made it harder to find a job.
    | a range of subjects

    adj

    1 likely to be affected by sth

    VERBS

    be, seem | become | leave sb/sth, make sb/sth
    His illness left him subject to asthmatic attacks.

    ADV.

    very | increasingly | rather | still
    At this stage these are proposals and are still subject to change.

    2 under the authority of sb/sth

    VERBS

    be
    Everyone was entirely subject to the whim of the Sultan.
    | become | remain | make sb/sth
    All the priories were made directly subject to the abbot of Cluny.

    ADV.

    entirely | directly | expressly


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