Từ điển trực tuyến - Online Dictionary
course
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English - Vietnamese Dictionary
course /kɔ:s/
  • danh từ
    • tiến trình, dòng; quá trình diễn biến
      • the course of a river: dòng sông
      • the course of events: quá trình diễn biến các sự kiện
    • sân chạy đua, vòng chạy đua; trường đua ngựa ((cũng) race course)
    • hướng, chiều hướng; đường đi
      • the ship is on her right course: con tàu đang đi đúng hướng
    • cách cư sử, cách giải quyết; đường lối, con đường ((nghĩa bóng))
      • to follow a dangerous course: theo con đường nguy hiểm
      • to hold one's course: theo con đường đã vạch sẵn
      • to take its course: theo con đường của nó; cứ tiến hành
      • several courses open before us: trước mắt chúng ta có nhiều cách giải quyết
    • món ăn (đưa lần lượt)
    • loạt; khoá; đợt; lớp
      • course of lectures: một loạt bài giảng, một đợt thuyết trình
    • hàng gạch, hàng đá
    • (số nhiều) đạo đức, tư cách
    • (số nhiều) kỳ hành kinh
    • by course of
      • theo thủ tục (lệ) thông thường
    • course of nature
      • lệ thường lẽ thường
    • in course
      • đang diễn biến
    • in the course of
      • trong khi
    • in due course
      • đúng lúc; đúng trình tự
    • a matter of course
      • một vấn đề dĩ nhiên
    • of course
      • dĩ nhiên, đương nhiên, tất nhiên
    • to take one's own course
      • làm theo ý mình
  • ngoại động từ
    • săn đuổi (thỏ)
    • cho (ngựa) chạy
    • nội động từ
      • chạy
      • chảy
        • blood courses through vein: máu chảy qua tĩnh mạch
    • danh từ
      • (thơ ca) ngựa chiến; con tuấn mã
    Concise Dictionary
    courses|coursed|coursingkɔːs
    noun
    +education imparted in a series of lessons or meetings
    +a connected series of events or actions or developments
    +facility consisting of a circumscribed area of land or water laid out for a sport
    +a mode of action
    +a line or route along which something travels or moves
    +general line of orientation
    +part of a meal served at one time
    +(construction) a layer of masonry
    verb
    +move swiftly through or over
    +move along, of liquids
    +hunt with hounds
    adv.
    +as might be expected
    Thesaurus Dictionary
    n.
    1 path, way, orbit, route, run, track, ambit, line, circuit, passage:
    We continued on our course. The sun pursued its fiery course across the heavens.
    2 movement, progress, headway, advance, progression; speed:
    The driver slackens his course at the curves.
    3 procedure, process, performance, routine, conduct, order, practice, dispatch or despatch, execution:
    In the course of her duties, she handles a great deal of money.
    4 direction, tack:
    If we stay on this course we'll run aground.
    5 class, lecture, seminar, programme:
    You should sign up for a course in English grammar.
    6 of course. naturally, surely, certainly, positively, obviously, definitely, assuredly, by all means; undoubtedly, indubitably, without (a) doubt, no doubt, Colloq US sure:
    Of course I'll go to the theatre with you!
    Advanced English Dictionary
    noun, verb
    + noun
    education
    1 [C] ~ (in / on sth) a series of lessons or LECTURES on a particular subject: a French / chemistry course + to take / do a course in art and design + to go on a management training course + The college runs specialist language courses.
    See also - CORRESPONDENCE COURSE, CRASH adj., FOUNDATION COURSE, INDUCTION COURSE, REFRESHER COURSE, SANDWICH COURSE
    2 [C] (especially BrE) a period of study at a college or university that leads to an exam or a qualification: a degree course + a two-year postgraduate course leading to a master's degree
    Compare: PROGRAMME n. (5)
    direction
    3 [U, C, usually sing.] a direction or route followed by a ship or an aircraft: The plane was on / off course (= going / not going in the right direction). + He radioed the pilot to change course. + They set a course for the islands.
    4 [C, usually sing.] the general direction in which sb's ideas or actions are moving: The president appears likely to change course on some key issues. + Politicians are often obliged to steer a course between incompatible interests.
    action
    5 (also course of action) [C] a way of acting in or dealing with a particular situation: There are various courses open to us. + What course of action would you recommend? + The wisest course would be to say nothing.
    development
    6 [sing.] of sth the way sth develops or should develop: an event that changed the course of history + The unexpected course of events aroused considerable alarm.
    part of meal
    7 [C] any of the separate parts of a meal: a four-course dinner + The main course was roast duck.
    for golf
    8 [C] = GOLF COURSE: He set a new course record.
    for races
    9 [C] an area of land or water where races are held: She was overtaken on the last stretch of the course.
    See also - ASSAULT COURSE, RACECOURSE
    of river
    10 [C, usually sing.] the direction a river moves in: The path follows the course of the river.
    medical treatment
    11 [C] ~ (of sth) a series of medical treatments, PILLS, etc: to prescribe a course of antibiotics + When taking antibiotics it is important to finish the course.
    in wall
    12 [C] a continuous layer of bricks, stone, etc. in a wall: A new damp-proof course could cost £1 000 or more.
    Idioms: in course of sth (formal) going through a particular process: The new textbook is in course of preparation.
    in / over the course of ... (used with expressions for periods of time) during: He's seen many changes in the course of his long life. + The company faces major challenges over the course of the next few years.
    in the course of time when enough time has passed
    Synonym: EVENTUALLY
    It is possible that in the course of time a cure for cancer will be found.
    in the ordinary, normal, etc. course of events, things, etc. as things usually happen
    Synonym: NORMALLY
    In the normal course of things we would not treat her disappearance as suspicious.
    of course
    1 (also informal course) (spoken) used to emphasize that what you are saying is true or correct: 'Don't you like my mother?' 'Of course I do!' + 'Will you be there?' 'Course I will.'
    2 (also informal course) (spoken) used as a polite way of giving sb permission to do sth: 'Can I come, too?' 'Course you can.' + 'Can I have one of those pens?' 'Of course-help yourself.'
    3 (spoken)used as a polite way of agreeing with what sb has just said: 'I did all I could to help.' 'Of course,' he murmured gently.
    4 used to show that what you are saying is not surprising or is generally known or accepted: Ben, of course, was the last to arrive. + Of course, there are other ways of doing this.
    of course not (also informal course not) used to emphasize the fact that you are saying 'no': 'Are you going?' 'Of course not.' + 'Do you mind?' 'No, of course not.'
    on course for sth / to do sth likely to achieve or do sth because you have already started to do it: The American economy is on course for higher inflation than Britain by the end of the year. + Victory in Saturday's match will put them on course to qualify for the European championships.
    run / take its course to develop in the usual way and come to the usual end: When her tears had run their course, she felt calmer and more in control. + With minor ailments the best thing is often to let nature take its course.
    more at COLLISION, DUE adj., HORSE n., MATTER n., MIDDLE adj., PAR, PERVERT v., STAY v.
    + verb [V +adv./prep.] (literary) (of liquid) to move or flow quickly
    BRITISH / AMERICAN
    course / program
    In BrE course is used for a series of lessons or lectures on a particular subject: a physics course + a course of ten lectures.In AmE you would say:
    a physics course/program + a program of ten lectures.

    In AmE a course is usually an individual unit that forms part of a longer period of study: I have to take a physics course/class. This is called a module in Britain, especially in a college or university.
    In BrE course can also mean a period of study at a college or university: a two-year college course. In AmE you would say:
    a two-year college program.

    MORE ABOUT
    of course
    Of course is often used to show that what you are saying is not surprising or is generally known or accepted. For this reason, and because it can be difficult to get the right intonation, you may not sound polite if you use of course or of course not when you answer a request for information or permission. It can be safer to use a different word or phrase.
    'Is this the right room for the English class?' 'Yes, it is.' + 'Of course.' or 'Of course it is'.
    'Can I borrow your dictionary?' 'Certainly.' (formal) + 'Sure.' (informal)
    'Do you mind if I borrow your dictionary?' 'Not at all.' + 'Go ahead.' (informal).
    If you say of course/of course not it may sound as though you think the answer to the question is obvious and that the person should not ask. In the same way, of course should not be used as a reply to a statement of fact or when someone expresses an opinion: 'It's a lovely day.' 'It certainly is.'/'Yes it is.' + 'Of course it is.' + 'I think you'll enjoy that play.' 'I'm sure I will.'/'Yes, it sounds really good.' + Of course.(also course)
    + noun
    a large area of land that is designed for playing golf on
    Collocation Dictionary
    noun

    1 complete series of lessons/studies

    ADJ.

    full-time, part-time | one-year, two-year, etc. | day, evening | crash, intensive | advanced, intermediate, etc. | foundation, introductory | refresher | academic | graduate, postgraduate, undergraduate | degree, diploma, honours
    a joint honours course in French and Russian
    | correspondence, external, sandwich | induction | training, vocational

    VERB + COURSE

    do, take
    He took a crash course in Italian.
    | enrol on, join, sign up for | withdraw from
    She withdrew from the course because of illness.
    | teach | offer, run
    The school runs courses all year round.
    | complete
    It took him five years to complete the course.
    | pass | fail

    COURSE + VERB

    run
    The course runs from 10?15 May.

    PREP.

    ~ in
    a course in applied linguistics
    | ~ on
    a course on the development of capitalism

    2 route/direction

    VERB + COURSE

    alter, change
    The boat altered course during the storm.
    | chart, plot, set
    We set course for Malta.
    | be blown off | follow
    The path follows the course of the river.

    PREP.

    off ~
    We're a long way off course
    | on ~
    We're on course for our destination.

    PHRASES

    on a collision course
    The two planes were on a collision course.

    3 (also course of action)

    ADJ.

    best, better

    VERB + COURSE

    adopt, follow, pursue, take
    It was the best course of action to take in the circumstances.

    COURSE + VERB

    be open to sb
    It was the only course open to him.

    4 development of sth over a period of time

    VERB + COURSE

    change
    an event that changed the course of his life
    | follow, run, take
    Her career followed a similar course to her sister's. We could do nothing but let the disease run its course.

    PREP.

    during the ~ of
    during the course of the war
    | in the ~ of
    In the course of time, I began to understand.

    PHRASES

    the course of history
    This was an event that changed the course of history.
    | in due course
    (= at the appropriate time; eventually),
    in the normal/ordinary course of events
    In the normal course of events, you should get a reply by Monday.
    | let nature take its course
    When the dog responded so badly to the treatment, we decided to let nature take its course (= stop treating it and let it die naturally).

    5 part of a meal

    ADJ.

    main | first, second, etc.

    PREP.

    for a/the ~
    We had chicken for our main course.

    PHRASES

    a two-/three-course, etc. meal

    6 in sport/a race

    ADJ.

    golf, obstacle, race

    VERB + COURSE

    complete
    Only ten yachts completed the course.

    7 series of medical treatments

    VERB + COURSE

    give sb, put sb on
    She's been put on a course of injections.
    | prescribe (sb) | take

    PREP.

    ~ of
    a course of antibiotics



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